Places

Greynolds Park

Greynolds Park was built by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), officially opening on March 29, 1936. Under the direction of landscape architect, William Lyman Phillip, the task force – a group of World War I veterans and unemployed teens – transformed an ugly landscape pockmarked with rock pits and refuse into an attractive public park. They built […]

Read more and view photos »

Anderson’s Corner

In 1911, Silver Palm Drive was a logging road connecting the Everglades to the shipping port of Black Point in South Biscayne Bay. At roughly the midway point, an entrepreneur named William “Popp” Anderson, who worked for railroad magnate Henry Flagler, built a general store that served what became a thriving farming community. The store […]

Read more and view photos »

Vizcaya

The Vizcaya Museum and Gardens shimmer in the reflection of Biscayne Bay, retaining the dream-like vision of farm-equipment heir James Deering, who chose the spectacular spot for his elaborate subtropical interpretation of an eighteenth-century Italian villa. The once-private property, built between 1914 and 1922 in the Coconut Grove area of Miami, is surrounded by nearly […]

Read more and view photos »

Coral Castle

Like a creation from the dawn of history, Coral Castle stands against the Dade County sky, a fantastic pile of stone built with one man’s sweat and labor.

Read more and view photos »

Venetian Pool

In 1923, Coral Gables’ founders had a problem: an unsightly rock pit in the middle of the fast-growing community. The Venetian Pool — one of the first public pools in South Florida — was born in 1924. Founder George Merrick got the idea to turn the coral rock pit — where much of the rock […]

Read more and view photos »

Crandon Park Zoo

From the late 1940s until August 1980, Crandon Park Zoo on Key Biscayne was the place to see bears, tigers, monkeys, reptiles and birds just a few steps from the beach. The zoo, located in the 900-acre Crandon Park, opened in 1948 and was the county’s first. It blossomed from the misfortune of a traveling […]

Read more and view photos »

Coconut Grove

From Seminole War battleground to Bahamian pioneer outpost to groovy hippie haven, Coconut Grove has had several incarnations. Originally spelled Cocoanut Grove – its residents decided to drop the “a” after its incorporation as a city in 1919- the village has attracted sailors, academics, artists, explorers, drop-outs and scientists. It was the place where northern […]

Read more and view photos »

Hialeah Park Race Track

The Hialeah Park Race Track, which opened Jan. 25, 1925, and was closed for two years during World War II, was the site of many racing firsts. It was the first track in this country to feature a turf course and the first major track at which a female jockey, Diane Crump in 1969, was […]

Read more and view photos »

Miami River

Five miles long, the Miami River has gone from a crystal clear wild river to gritty urban sprawl. Its early settlers, the Tequestas, shared the river’s banks and pools with panthers and alligators. In the first half of the 20th century, the Miami River Rapids area was dredged and dynamited to build the Miami Canal, […]

Read more and view photos »

Little Havana

La Pequeña Habana ‘Little Havana” got its name from the hundreds of thousands of Cubans who fled their homeland between the late 1950s and early 1970s and settled in what originally was a lower-middle-class Southern and Jewish neighborhood. By the early 1970s, the Cubans had changed the landscape. The aroma of just-brewed cafecito was everywhere. […]

Read more and view photos »
Page 4 of 6123456