Diners and delis

The last blue plate specials may have been served quite a while ago at some of these diners but they were beloved in their day.  Wolfie’s, a Miami Beach landmark for a half-century,  served a slew of famous — and infamous — patrons. Meyer Lansky, Muhammad Ali, Deion Sanders and Liza Minnelli enjoyed the overstuffed pastrami sandwiches and giant slices of  “world famous” cheesecake. Restaranteur Wolfie Cohen also opened Rascal House in 1954. A dining staple at Collins Avenue and 172nd Street — which outlived legendary delis like Pumperniks, Wolfie’s and Corky’s — it closed in 2008. And it’s been 32 years since the Concord Cafeteria served its last $3.69 luncheon special, but in its glory days, the 250-seat cafeteria served performers like Rudy Vallee. It also survived arson: In 1973,  Bal Harbour resident Charles Reardon walked into the  cafeteria,  threw gas on the floor  and lit a match. A blaze erupted,  killing three elderly people and injuring 131 others. Another well-known eatery that is still open, Lester’s Diner in Ft. Lauderdale, opened in 1967 and became known for its 14-ounce “bowl” of coffee.  And you’ll find the S&S Diner along a nondescript stretch of Northeast Second Avenue, south of the Design District and north of the Omni. Established in 1938 and boasting an 18-seat, horseshoe-shaped counter, the diner draws all types – bankers, yacht salesmen, fire rescue workers and lawyers.

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