• Early Settlements

    Coconut Grove

    From Seminole War battleground to Bahamian pioneer outpost to groovy hippie haven Coconut Grove has had several incarnations. The village, originally spelled Cocoanut Grove - its residents decided to drop the "a" after its incorporation as a city in 1919- has attracted sailors, academics, artists, explorers, drop-outs and scientists. It was the place where Refugee Northern millionaires built their sprawling estates near the bay and Bahamian blacks turned Charles Avenue into a district lush with its own sense of history and architecture.

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Coconut Grove

From Seminole War battleground to Bahamian pioneer outpost to groovy hippie haven, Coconut Grove has had several incarnations. Originally spelled Cocoanut Grove – its residents decided to drop the “a” after its incorporation as a city in 1919- the village has attracted sailors, academics, artists, explorers, drop-outs and scientists. It was the place where northern […]

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Cuban Rafter Crisis

In the early ’90′s, Cuban rafters began to cast off in alarming numbers. On July 13, 1994, Cuban government boats sank a commandeered tugboat that left at least 39 people dead. The next month, outraged Cuban citizens watched the government retake a hijacked ferry in Havana Bay to thwart another escape attempt. Rioting erupted. People […]

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Hialeah Park Race Track

The Hialeah Park Race Track, which opened Jan. 25, 1925, and was closed for two years during World War II, was the site of many racing firsts. It was the first track in this country to feature a turf course and the first major track at which a female jockey, Diane Crump in 1969, was […]

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Miami River

Five miles long, the Miami River has gone from a crystal clear wild river to gritty urban sprawl. Its early settlers, the Tequestas, shared the river’s banks and pools with panthers and alligators. In the first half of the 20th century the Miami River Rapids area was dredged and dynamited to build the Miami Canal, […]

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Little Havana

La Pequeña Habana ‘Little Havana” got its name from the hundreds of thousands of Cubans who fled their homeland between the late 1950s and early 1970s and settled in what originally was a lower-middle-class Southern and Jewish neighborhood. By the early 1970s, the Cubans had changed the landscape. The aroma of just-brewed cafecito was everywhere. […]

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Lemon City

Lemon City is an ancient neighborhood by Miami standards. Named after the unusually sweet lemon trees that grew in the area, Lemon City was the home to one of the county’s oldest schools, the Lemon City School, and first library, the Lemon City Library. One of its early markets, Rockmoor Grocery, would go on to […]

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Mutt Derby

In the annual “Mutt Derby” charity race, canines compete while their proud owners cheer them from behind the finish line. The motley pack of pups seem to scamper for only a few feet before stopping and then shooting off in different directions. The charity event was organized by local Jaycees associations around South Florida. In […]

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Downtown Miami

Downtown Miami has had its ups and downs. Crowded sidewalks and empty condos have reflected the boom-and-bust cycle of Florida real estate. From the bustling ’40s through the moribund ’70s to the vibrant downtown of today, the city’s core has bounced back over and over again, shaped by by speculators, hurricanes and exiles.  Though the […]

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United Way

For 90 years, United Way of Miami-Dade — once known as Miami Community Chest and United Fund of Dade County — has served the community. The organization’s first campaign, a three-day fundraising push in April 1924, raised about $136,000 to support 12 local agencies. Ninety years later, In 2012-2013, total revenue reached $63 million. Early […]

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